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How to Pay National Visa Center (NVC) Fees Electronically

May 9, 2022

If you are researching how to pay the National Visa Center (NVC) fees, CONGRATULATIONS! That means your petition has been approved, and you are continuing your U.S. immigration process. To begin, the most common way to get to this point is through an approved family petition. For example, an approved family member could be your U.S. citizen child over the age of 21, your U.S. citizen, or permanent resident spouse who files an approved I-130 petition on your behalf. When the United States Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) approves an I-130 petition, USCIS sends the approval to the National Visa Center (NVC), and the NVC generates the immigrant visa. As long as the priority date on the I-130 petition is current, you can submit your visa application on the NVC website. Here are the steps you need to take to pay your NVC fees: 1. Get Your Case Number and Invoice ID The NVC should have sent you a notice about your visa called “Notice of Immigrant Visa Creation.” This notice contains an NVC Case Number and an Invoice ID Number.     Note: The NVC case number will contain the initials of the city where you will do your Consular Processing. For example: ⦁ BGT: Bogota, Colombia ⦁ CDJ: Ciudad Juarez, Mexico ⦁ GTM: Guatemala City, Guatemala ⦁ GYQ: Guayaquil, Ecuador ⦁ SNS: San Salvador, El Salvador 2. Go to the Necessary Website to Make Payments Once you have your case number and invoice ID, go to the following website: https://ceac.state.gov/IV/Login.aspx and click on the box that says, “I have read the terms of the Privacy Act Notice.”   3. Enter your Case Data where Instructed Once you have checked the box that says, “I have read the terms of the Privacy Act Notice,” enter your NVC Case Number in the box that says “Case Number.” Then enter your Invoice ID Number in the box that says “Enter the Invoice ID Number that the National Visa Center sent you.”   4. Establish that You Are the Applicant Once you have entered your NVC Case Number and Invoice ID Number, select the “I am the APPLICANT” option from the drop down menu.   5. Fill In the Security Code Once you have entered your NVC Case Number, your Invoice ID Number, and select “I am the “APPLICANT,” enter the security letters and numbers you see on the screen to establish that you are a real person and not a bot. In this example, they would be “DA6DN” but everyone has a different configuration. Once you have entered that information, click the button, “Continue.”   6. Go to the Summary Information Screen Once you have pressed “Continue,” the following screen will appear: At this point, you are ready to make payments. Be sure to have your payment method available. If you leave the page open for more than a few minutes without activity, the page automatically reverts to the home page, and you will have to enter all your information again. 7. Enter your Payment Information To make the first payment, click on the link that says, “Pay Now” under the […]

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4 Things to Know About Deferred Action for Medical Reasons

November 23, 2021

Several individuals present in the United States qualify for an immigration program called “Deferred Action.” There are several types of deferred action available to immigrants in the United States, but the focus of this blog is for those who are the caregivers of children, parents, or spouses that are United States citizens or Lawful Permanent Residents with severe medical conditions. Circumstances For Deferred Action  This type of Deferred Action is an excellent option for individuals and families without status who present these compelling equities:  a serious medical condition long-term presence in the United States close family ties   A Humanitarian Outlook  Under this type of program, individuals might request the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (“USICS”) to defer removal or deportation for humanitarian reasons. This kind of discretion is vital to maintaining a compassionate immigration system and a healthy society. It also helps to carefully use limited resources to deport those who present a danger. Historically, officials have considered the following factors: the likelihood of removal the presence of sympathetic factors the likelihood a large amount of adverse publicity will be generated because of the sympathetic factors whether the individual is a member of a class of deportable aliens whose removal has been given high enforcement priority If Deferred Action is granted, it is given in 2-year increments. While Deferred Action does not confer lawful status on an individual and does not provide a path to permanent residence or citizenship, individuals who have obtained deferred action are eligible to apply for employment authorization. Making a World of Difference Recently, our office helped a single mother of a four-year-old US citizen with severe Down’s Syndrome, intellectual disabilities, and heart defects.  Our client needed a driver’s license to be able to take her child to doctor appointments and therapy without the worry of immigration authorities detaining her. Thanks to the Deferred Action program, our client was able to obtain an employment authorization card and a Georgia Driver’s License. Our client is now focusing on the health of her child without being worried about deportation. Considering Deferred Action Options If you are the caregiver of a U.S. citizen or Lawful Permanent Resident child, parent, or spouse with severe medical conditions, you may want to consider this option. If you want more information about this type of Deferred Action, contact the attorneys Zambrano & Ruiz at 770-769-5820.

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4 Important Things to Consider When Applying for a Green Card

November 22, 2021

To begin, what is a green card? Officially known as a Permanent Resident Card, it is proof of a person’s lawful permanent residency in the United States. A green card demonstrates that the cardholder is living in the United States legally. The United States government has therefore granted the green card holder the authorization to live and work in the country permanently. There are several different ways that a person can apply to receive a green card so that they can be a permanent resident of the United States. The ways in which a person can receive a green card is through employment, holding the status of a “special immigrant” like a religious worker, or for humanitarian reasons like having status as an asylee or refugee or being a human trafficking or crime victim. These paths are just a few of the many ways one can obtain a green card. But one of the most common ways people can obtain permanent residency is through a family member. If the person seeking this status is an “immediate relative” of the citizen or permanent resident, then they could be eligible to obtain a green card through that relative. According to the United States government’s US Immigration and Citizenship Services, an immediate relative is defined as the spouse of a U.S. citizen, the unmarried child under the age of 21 of a U.S. citizen, or the parent of a U.S. citizen (21 years or old). Many times, this means that the family member can petition on their behalf. There are many people living in the United States and abroad whose parents have U.S. citizenship or lawful permanent residency. Clients frequently ask us during consultations if a parent with U.S. citizenship or lawful permanent residency can petition to obtain permanent resident status, or a green card, for their child. Generally, the eligibility criteria of the adult child hinges on whether or not they are married and whether or not they are under the age of 21. Please see a breakdown below to determine whether a family-based petition filed for a green card by your parent on your behalf is an option for you. My parent is a U.S. citizen. Can they petition to obtain a green card for me? Yes. An immigrant visa or green card is immediately available for the children of United States citizens. For immigration purposes, children are considered “unmarried people under the age of 21.” If you are over the age of 21 and unmarried, you are eligible to seek residency in this manner. This category is known as “first preference” or F1. Keep in mind that you will have to wait for your priority date to become current before you can apply for your immigrant visa, so it is not immediately available. If you are over the age of 21 and married, which is known as third preference (F3),  you are also eligible to seek residency and obtain a green card in this manner. You will also have to wait for your priority date to become current before you may apply for your immigrant visa. My parent is a […]

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What should I do to be a beneficiary of an O Visa?

January 14, 2020

Is there a difference between a Green Card and an O Visa? Are there different types of O Visas? How do I apply for an O Visa? All of these questions and more will be answered in this blog. If you have additional questions, we’re experienced immigration lawyers that will be happy to talk to you. What is an O Visa? First, an O Visa is a nonimmigrant visa granted by the USCIS for a person who possesses extraordinary skills in the areas of science, arts, education, business, and sports. That is, they have managed to be recognized in their professions nationally or worldwide for achievements in their fields. This sounds like a broad category for visas, but the beneficiary of the visa, or the person who is hoping to come work in the U.S, must meet at least three of the eight O Visa requirements to be considered. There are three different types of O Visas depending on the field of expertise, work assistance, and family members.  O-1 Visa (a): visa granted to all those people with an extraordinary ability in science, education, business or sports. O-1 Visa (b): visa granted to all those people with an extraordinary ability in the field of the arts, as well as in movies and on television. O-2 Visa: this visa is granted to those people who will accompany the person holding the O-1 Visa. These people are an integral or essential part of the work and must have a high critical capacity and experience to help the worker perform in the United States. O-3 Visa: visa granted to people who are spouses or children of the person who is requesting an O-1 Visa or an O-2 Visa. What is “extraordinary ability”? Success is measured differently all around the world. So what does it mean to have an extraordinary ability that qualifies someone for an O-1 Visa (a or b) instead of a Green Card or another type of visa? The USCIS has a list of requirements that the person must meet in order to be considered for an O Visa. These requirements serve as proof that they have achieved success in their professional career and, therefore, have enough documents to support and enforce the claim.     Unless the person possesses a major internationally recognized award such as a Nobel Prize, they must meet three of the following eight requirements: Recipient of one or several national or international awards in their field for excellent work. Membership in a nationally or internationally recognized organization focused on excellence and outstanding achievements in their field of expertise. Published material in a professional or major trade publications or other types of major media. These do not necessarily have to be written by the person, but they must highlight the significance of them and their work. Contributed original scientific, scholarly/academic, and/or business related work that is of major significance in their field of expertise Author of scholarly articles in their field published either in professional journals or other major media that require classification to be published in. Be paid a high salary or other form of compensation […]

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An Overview of Deportation Basics

November 8, 2019

The United States reserves the right to deport foreigners who participate in criminal acts, threaten public safety or violate the detailed specifications on their visas. Crossing the border without documentation or with forged documentation counts as a criminal act and can make you eligible for deportation from the country. Even when you enter the United States with the appropriate visa, if you violate the terms of that visa, you may also be eligible for deportation. There are many ways to be expelled from the United States: accelerated deportation, reinstatement of deportation, administrative deportation, regular deportation … You can know what type of proceedings you’re in based on the document the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) has given you to explain your removal. However, you can and should contact an immigration lawyer to find out your legal status. Expedited removal Accelerated deportation occurs when you are arrested at or near the border. The accelerated or expedited detention and deportation law was passed by Congress over 20 years ago and the measure was applied to the first 100 miles from the border. However, in July 2019, the law was adapted to the whole country for undocumented immigrants who had been in the country for less than 2 years. If you fear you may fall into this category, don’t panic. Contact an immigration lawyer and follow these recommendations: Gather evidence to prove your physical presence within the U.S. This evidence will help you avoid an expedited deportation process. Keep original documents. If you are arrested, you won’t be able to access the documents that prove your presence in the U.S, so someone your trust must be able to access the documents.   Reinstatement of removal The restoration of deportation is a process linked to expedited or accelerated deportation. It occurs when you are arrested for entering the United States without documentation after being previously deported. In this case, deportation will be reordered without a hearing before an immigration judge, even if your circumstances have changed. Administrative removal Administrative removal occurs if DHS (Department of Homeland Security) says that you have been convicted of a violent crime and, therefore, are not a permanent legal resident of the United States. How to know the status of my deportation? If the document you have is a “Notice of Appearance,” then your regular deportation process has begun. If your document is an “Order to prove cause”, then you are in deportation proceedings. Finally, a document labeled as I-110 or I-122 means that you are being deported. The Zambrano & Ruiz Law Firm can help with any of these deportation procedures. They passionately advocate for immigrants in order for families to stay together. The Voluntary Departure The voluntary departure is an option, often chosen after a hearing with an immigration judge. You can choose to leave the United States before completing the expulsion process. If you do so voluntarily, you can request re-entry without any problem. Failure to do so means you could face a fine and a 10-year ban on various forms of relief from deportation. If during immigration, detention, or removal proceedings you are discriminated against, […]

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How to renew your Green Card?

November 15, 2016

The expiration or expiration of a Green Card does not mean that you are no longer a permanent legal resident of the United States. Unless you commit a crime that causes you to enter the list of deportable persons or stay abroad for longer, you will remain a permanent resident for life. To show the relevant authorities that you can live and work legally in the United States, in order to travel and return without problems, you just have to keep in mind the renewal times. When you have a 10-year Green Card it is very important to renew it immediately and if it expired or will expire in the next 6 months, it is important to consider these steps: Complete a renewal application online or by mail. Gather your supporting documents. Pay government fees, if necessary. Send your request and wait for your new green card. It is very important to consider the times since USCIS can deny your request and withhold your payment if you submit your request too soon. How do I check the status of my application? The status of your renewal application can be reviewed online only with your receipt number. In the event that your application for the renewal of the Green Card is denied and meets all the requirements, you will need the help of an immigration lawyer to review your application and file a motion. In these cases, the collaboration of a lawyer is important because you will not be allowed to appeal a negative decision of this Agency. Not as long as the law is met, there are situations in which the US government. UU. You could deny a Green Card renewal application.   The clearest example is having committed a crime or not paying the corresponding taxes. Although it also happens that your request is denied for lying or submitting an incorrect form. However, you will always receive a letter explaining the reason you were denied. Once you need the services of an immigration lawyer in Atlanta to file a motion, you can ask the USCIS office to consider reviewing your case again to examine your decision. To reopen your case you must present the evidence and documents by which you are eligible to renew your Green card. “When you appeal a decision to the AAO, the USCIS office that made the original decision will first review the appeal to determine whether you should take favorable measures and grant the requested immigration benefit. During this “initial field review,” the review office will treat the timely appeal as a motion to reopen or a motion to reconsider and approve the request or request; or forward the appeal and the record of procedures related to the AAO to issue a new decision. ” USCIS – Appeals and Motions The review of the green card motion may take approximately 45 days. But, in case USCIS grants your request to the AAO (Office of Administrative Appeals) for further review, it may be ready within the first 6 months of your appeal. The Zambrano & Ruiz attorneys are aware of immigration laws and can know […]

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